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Workshop renovation work

Community Manager Jason
Community Manager

Workshop renovation work

Woodworking.jpg

 

Workshop community update #85

 

Hi all,

 

We hope you’re all enjoying using the new-look Workshop and encourage you all to join in the home improvement discussion.

 

Our renovation work was based on your feedback and designed to dramatically improve the user experience on mobile devices.

 

We also wanted to make the site quicker and easier to use on all devices, so it’s now easier to join the community, easier to participate in discussions, easier to share photos and easier to find posts you are interested in.

 

Many thanks for all your feedback and your patience while we worked to improve the site. Please let me know if you ever need a hand getting the most from Workshop, or have suggestions about how we can make the site even more useful for you.

 

Favourite projects 

 

Some of the favourite projects shared on the site in recent weeks include:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve also loved sharing a couple of member stories in the past week. Don’t miss the chance to get to know Rob Pegley, best known for his popular caravan renovation projects, and Belinda Smith, a very experienced renovation expert.

 

Top contributors

 

Many thanks to all Workshop contributors over recent weeks. The members who have received the most likes have been:

 

@LePallet

@r23on

@RobPegley

@woodalwaysworks

@kel

@bergs

@Kiwifr33

@Jonb

@Salmaninoz

@Jamespeter100.

 

Well done to all our contributors – you are certainly worthy of all the kudos.

 

Keep sharing,

 

Jason

Community Manager

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r23on
Established Contributor

Re: Workshop renovation work

Hi Jason

I would like to raise a point of interest. Since joining the group I have seen a lot of interesting projects produced by those with many years of experience whether they be formally trained or trial and error, and I am sure in either case the learning process has thrown up a number of issues and the biggest one would be tool usage, i.e. How do I use it?

A simple example of this would be using a sanding tool, as simple as it may seem there is a correct way to use them, e.g. what pad to use first followed by the next and so on, or how to hold the unit, how much pressure to apply during the sanding process.

This is only one example and the list is quiet long let alone the use of things like power saws which hospitals get see finger removed on regular bases.

I am making a suggestion that perhaps with in the renovation section an area be provided for the usage or how to use a tool / tools be provided. In the photo above it show a chisel being used, a block plan (end grain plan) on the bench and a sanding device in the background. How many newbies would know how too?

Perhaps I am on the wrong track here but it a point of interest. What do others think?

Community Manager Jason
Community Manager

Re: Workshop renovation work

It's an excellent suggestion @r23on and I am certainly keen to hear what other community members think.

 

Bunnings has some introductory videos for different tools at https://www.bunnings.com.au/diy-advice/diy-basics-and-skills/diy-basics but I'm sure some more detailed information would be very helpful to a lot of people. 

 

Jason

 

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r23on
Established Contributor

Re: Workshop renovation work

Hi Jason

I will take the leap here and kick it off. For me the basic intorduction is not enough I am always looking for more. Even though I know the following information, someone may find it useful. The only problem is the advertising that goes with it. It's the how to that's important.

The discussion is on the random orbit sander. There is nothing worse than a lot of words and no photos or videos. the following link will save me a lot of typing and I find it explains things nicely. I hope this provides some good undestanding on radom ordit sanding. I am sure there is or are other video out there as well. (Only if I could find some Australian content)

Patrick
Occasional Browser

Re: Workshop renovation work

Very good teacher, great demonstration. One small criticism, the contact of the vac tube with the mat could affect the smoothness of the strokes, and could be a safety factor if the tool jerks. I suggest a few dummy strokes to the extremes of the workpiece to test for such snags.
Community Manager Jason
Community Manager

Re: Workshop renovation work

Thanks for joining in the discussion and sharing your expertise @Patrick. It sounds like you have plenty of knowledge and experience to share with the Workshop community. It's great to have you join us.

 

Please feel free to Start a new discussion whenever you need a hand with anything, or have a new project to share. I'm looking forward to reading about your projects and plans. 

 

Welcome,

 

Jason

 

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r23on
Established Contributor

Re: Workshop renovation work

Thanks for the reply Patrick

Valid point, he did seggest either method. The main point here is about the techniques of using the sander. Having spoken to a lot of usesrs there seem to be this belife that the harder you apply pressure to the sander the better it works. and the more you can take off. 

One point he did not adress was that when sanding takes place heat is generated in turn the pads clog at a faster rate and in some case casuasing burning of the timber (depending on the timber). Of cause then there is the issue of wear and tear on the sander.

The main points when using powered sander (AC or DC) addressed.

 

a. Sand in the direction of grain not across the grain

b. Take overlapping stockes and take the sander just over the edge of the job for good coverage 

c. let the sander do the work (do not apply heavy pressure to the sander)

d. Selection of sanding pads (grit ) is another topic of its own ( to remove more material, use a 60 or 80 grit)

There is another side to this - the same principles apply to hand sanding.

Using either powered sanders or hand sanding heat is generated causing the sanding materials to clog. Why? the pitch is being drawn out of the timber with heat.

 

A power activated vac is not something a lot of users would own I would suggest. Found more in a well steup home workshop and once again I would suggest they will have a full handel on how to use such equipment.

On the safety side of things there is a level of safety attached to all tools powered or not, saftey direction - we all should read about before using the tools (but do we?)

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Workshop is a friendly place to learn, get ideas and find inspiration for your home improvement projects