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Seeking advice on removing metal doorstop/frame (?) and shelves from wardrobe cavities.

Moose
Junior Contributor

Seeking advice on removing metal doorstop/frame (?) and shelves from wardrobe cavities.

IMG-6465.jpgIMG-6466.jpgIMG-6467.jpgIMG-6468.jpgIMG-6469.jpg

 

Hi, we need to remove the metal components from inside our 1980's wardrobes. Someone suggested it's just a matter of angle grinding. Having never done anything similar, is that the way we go about it, and is there anything we should know in advance?

 

We are apparently also then needing to patch and paint before the cabinet maker comes and installs all the next shelves, drawers etc. Have also never painted or plastered, so I'd like to minimise the damage needing repair.

 

Thank you for any help!

Community Manager Jason
Community Manager

Re: Seeking advice on removing metal doorstop/frame and shelves from wardrobe cavities

Hi @Moose,

 

Welcome to the Workshop community. Apologies for the slow reply. Let me tag a few very helpful members who might like to share some advice about how they would go about this job.

 

@ProjectPete@Brad@royq@gippslandhome@Bundaboy@JustJim@Mathy        

 

When it comes to painting, I'm sure you'll be painting like a pro in no time. This guide from @RobPegley should help - https://www.workshop.com.au/t5/Best-of-Workshop/How-to-paint-like-a-professional/ba-p/32597

 

Thanks again for joining us. We are looking forward to seeing the end result.

 

Jason

 

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royq
Established Contributor

Re: Seeking advice on removing metal doorstop/frame and shelves from wardrobe cavities

Hi @Moose,
That's a decent sized section so without being able to access all sides you would need a pretty big grinder, which will make a big mess too. My first preference for tool choice would be a multi function tool with metal cutting blade, you'll be able to get into the corners without cutting thru into the wall too much.
Roy
Bundaboy
Experienced Contributor

Re: Seeking advice on removing metal doorstop/frame and shelves from wardrobe cavities

A reciprocating saw with a demo blade or metal cutting blade should make short work of it I would think BUT I am a big believer that things should be taken out the reverse of how they went in when possible, you, or someone may be able to re-purpose it, are there no fixings at all? I certainly can't see any in the photos but sometimes they are hidden behind reveals etc.
Brad
Trusted Contributor

Re: Seeking advice on removing metal doorstop/frame and shelves from wardrobe cavities

+1 to what Roy said, not sure how we survived before the multi tool was invented.
JustJim
Established Contributor

Re: Seeking advice on removing metal doorstop/frame and shelves from wardrobe cavities

I agree with all of what has been said. I'm sure this wasn't welded in place so it shouldn't need to be cut up to be removed. Having said that, it may be held with No More Nails or similar construction adhesive rather than screws. Taking that out is going to mess up the plaster considerably.

If you do need to cut metal in place, yes a reciprocating saw (Sawzall or the like) or a multi purpose tool would be far preferable to an angle grinder because of the mess and sparks.

Love the TARDIS ug-boot slippers though! 😃
Stay safe,
Join your union,

Jim
Moose
Junior Contributor

Re: Seeking advice on removing metal doorstop/frame and shelves from wardrobe cavities

IMG_6562.jpgInside of metal support to be removedIMG_6563.jpgMy neatest nail hole..Thank you everyone!
I've gotten started, I went out to the shed and found my multi-tool, I normally really only use it for making nature resources for my role in early childhood, and I couldn't find a the metal blade so I got a new one. My husband pushed the shelf upwards and used a screwdriver to lever off one support. I don't have the arm strength to do that so I used one of my chisels and a hammer. I messed up the chidel angle on some holes, so some are neat and some are a bit deeper. All my power packs were flat so I'll try the power tool component tomorrow.
Having never cut metal before, is there anything to particularly watch out for? Will I be dealing with flying sparks and so need a floor cover?
Thank you again!
Vee

Moose
Junior Contributor

Re: Seeking advice on removing metal doorstop/frame and shelves from wardrobe cavities

I forgot to say - yes, the ugg boots are a big hit in our house. We have three pairs between us all and sometimes I accidentally end up with the wrong boot, and I always have a moment of thinking "gee, it feels bigger on the inside!"

Bundaboy
Experienced Contributor

Re: Seeking advice on removing metal doorstop/frame and shelves from wardrobe cavities

You shouldn't get sparks but you will get metal chips going on the floor so best cover it up, please wear eye and ear protection when doing this. Go slow and easy, watch out for kick back by making sure you have a good grip on the tool at all times.

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Moose
Junior Contributor

Re: Seeking advice on removing metal doorstop/frame and shelves from wardrobe cavities

Partial success! Presenting an almost empty wardrobe cavity. I've learnt a hell of a lot about multitools, including how to (not) treat blades! No more pushing, overheating, or too high an oscillation speed.. The bits I have left are right at the join. This is where the cabinet maker originally told me to cut with the angle grinder, he said they would just be spot welded on. These darlings are not just spot welded! I tried to cut there originally, and I couldn't even start a cut. Someone today suggested that this could be because the weld is too tough to cut. Could I please ask if anyone has any thoughts? I do have an angle grinder, although I haven't yet fold the spindle key. I also found a flap disc, which my friend had suggested would be the better way to go in terms of being worried about using it. But I am very much still unsure of using it and would have preferred to use the multi tool if possible.
Thank you for all you advice, I honestly wouldn't have made it this far without it!IMG_6623.jpgIMG_6622.jpgIMG_6618.jpgIMG_6621.jpgIMG_6591.jpg

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