Workshop
Start a discussion

The Workshop community can help with your home improvement projects.

Using an epoxy kit in the garage

maknilsin
Experienced Contributor

Using an epoxy kit in the garage

I've recently been looking at this product after I saw an ad on TV for it: http://www.bunnings.com.au/dy-mark-8l-epoxy-slate-garage-floor-coating-kit_p1580415

 

Has anyone had any experience using a product like this? I'm really tempted as I feel like sealing up the garage floor this way will make the space far more versatile as more than just a place to store my car.

Community Manager Jason
Community Manager

Re: Using an epoxy kit in the garage

@maknilsin

 

I'm sure Workshop members will be keen to share their experiences and advice for your garage floor. 

 

We just got the concrete floor of our new games room polished and sealed. There's a photo on this discussion. As you are building new it might be worth exploring, but isn't a cheap exercise. 

 

Jason

See something interesting? Give it the thumbs up!

Wayne
Super Contributor

Re: Using an epoxy kit in the garage

I have not used epoxy floor coat but I am subscribed to a number of woodworking forums with many American members, they swear by it. Easy clean up of accidental spills, far easier to sweep up sawdust and some even claim it is nicer to walk on.
Here is a youtube video on the process...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBeUWXvK0nU

Wood Working with Wayne
Andy_Mann
Trusted Contributor

Re: Using an epoxy kit in the garage

@maknilsin

I'm with Wood Working Wayne about American forums, they're a wealth of information.

A product line that came up frequently, was Rustoleum, so I googled the American site to scan their full range of products, & came across Rocksolid, which had a "New!" tag on it.

http://www.rustoleum.com/product-catalog/consumer-brands/rocksolid/exterior-concrete-coatings/decora...

I was pleased to see that the Australian site mentioned it too, but our listing may not be up to date, as there was no mention of the NeverWet properties, which is a shame if not available here yet, because it would make it a lot safer if it became wet.

John1
Experienced Contributor

Re: Using an epoxy kit in the garage

Always remember that epoxy is very stiff and strong.That is of course the spiel behind the epoxy resin kits and resin.

The down side is and yes their is definitely a down side. I have used it hundreds of times but only in certain jobs and those jobs are in areas that will not move. Sadly many people think strength means long lasting. Sorry but it actually means that you must look at the area you live in. If your house has been built on a soil that moves it will fail. Eventualy. It was a standing joke in the fibreglass industry when Pebblecreate hit the market.  Most failed as they did not take into consideration that the earth as well as concrete move or give and take naturally. Epoxy wont its stiff and wont move.

That is why epoxies fail due to it not giving and taking and lack of understanding. Like Polyesters and Acrylics. The amount of boaties who swear by epoxy have more often than not been faced with expensive repair and replacement bills due this problem.

Epoxy is to thick a resin, to completely saturate the concrete and give a solid bond.

Is the product a real epoxy or a hybrid [mixed with another type of resin or chemicals that dilute the epoxy]. I would rather use a Vinyl Ester resin mix as I think this is really what they are calling epoxy.

I see some of you thinking this guy is nuts. If the coating seeps into the concrete it is a hybrid and not an epoxy. Paint a bit on a piece of cardboard an allow it to dry completely [while it is not dry it will warp with the cardboard if you bend it] usually a week would do the trick and then warp the cardboard now either the cardboard around the epoxy will crease and the epoxy coat will remain unaffected this means you have a real epoxy. Now if the resin warps with the cardboard it is definitely not an epoxy resin.

The longer you leave a resin the harder it becomes.

Andy_Mann
Trusted Contributor

Re: Using an epoxy kit in the garage

@John1

 

Thanks for passing on your vast experience, everything that you said (that I understood), makes perfect sense, you're a champion mate.

 

I found this link which evaluated the new RockSolid formulation in 2014, & followed it up with a positive 2016 update, so thought it might interesting.

 

http://allgaragefloors.com/rocksolid-polycuramine-garage-floor-coat/

John1
Experienced Contributor

Re: Using an epoxy kit in the garage

Sorry AndyMan

To simplify my sager.

Yes the Rocksolid is created using Epoxy and Polyurethane. This is the same as many of these kits where Epoxy is use by itself as a coat.

Epoxy is solid and the thicker it is used the more risk of fracturing. It actually becomes brittle over time. It is the fibreglass, Carbon Fibre or Kevlar that hold the epoxy together and as a combination less epoxy, less thickness less likely to fracture. It does as I stated will eventually fail as a resin only product. West Systems who were the largest manufacture of Epoxy and Epoxy systems admitted that if used by itself  or the layup [material and resin together] is to resin rich will eventually become brittle and fail [hence the yacht masts.

Vinyl Ester was created to take over from using a resin rich or straight resin only applications.

Polyurethane Now your talking is the  bonding resin. It has been used for many years and is used in the same manner as an Epoxy resin. STOP. Epoxy and Polyurethane are a two resin mix always called an A and a B monomer [resin and hardener].

 

Polyurethane is better known as a Foam. When mixed you have a short time before it begins to react [foam up] and the solidify. If you get it on yourself or any surface you can remove the foam but not the actual resin the bond is permanent. Now you get it the Bond [it is the proverbial **bleep** that sticks to the blanket]. But polyurethane as a laminating resin wont work it is meant as a foaming agent.

 

Now I do not understand the chemicals used that will bond these two completely different resins with two different hardeners work. It has always been my interpretation of these resins that you cannot interchange the hardeners. so how they have managed it is pure science.

 

Now the problem always arrises the actual mixing process. You cannot always use a drill or motorised mixer as it creates tiny bubbles that require another chemical to disperses. I am not going into that now. These tiny bubble are a danger sign if you have a clear mix but you do not in this kind of application the mix is coloured. These bubbles are filled with air, air expands and contracts just like everything else in these bubbles but air during its expansion grows the tiny bubble until one bubble join another bubble and so on. hence the brittle reaction has begun. and will not stop.

 

One of the problems you will get is areas or patches of either a milky white or a yellow as stated in the article. This will happen it is the Russian Roulette Factor in other words it is not the users fault all the time it is in the manufacturing process one batch will be fine and look marvellous and the next shoddy and motley. This could be either the air moisture, the sun [UV], cold and i could go on and on, [ this is the short version] if you cannot understand this then you cannot follow the directions properly. 

 

I could go on and on but if you cannot read this then get someone who has had experiance as it my give you a couple of extra bullets in your game of Russian Roulette. Let the buyer beware. The manufacturer in this case has the odds of  in his favour in this case.

 

 

 

Andy_Mann
Trusted Contributor

Re: Using an epoxy kit in the garage

@John1

 

No worries, chemistry has never been my strong point, & I'm borderline ignorant of the complexities of your field of expertise. I (mistakenly) thought that the article lined up with what you said. ; )

By the way, do you know of a product something like a liquid linoleum, that would set more pliably, it'd be cool if there was.

 

Kermit
Valued Contributor

Re: Using an epoxy kit in the garage

@maknilsin

 

Check out this - https://www.instagram.com/p/BMBLTHcj55d/

 

Looks to be a great result. 

maknilsin
Experienced Contributor

Re: Using an epoxy kit in the garage

That looks great @Kermit - I'll have to film something similar when I can get in and do my own!

Why join the Workshop community?

Workshop is a friendly place to learn, get ideas and find inspiration for your home improvement projects