Workshop
Start a discussion

The Workshop community can help with your home improvement projects.

Correct saw blade

Brian68
Newbie

Correct saw blade

Which curcular saw blade is better for hard wood. One with more or less teeth

Community Manager Jason
Community Manager

Re: Correct saw blade

Good question for your first post Brian. I'm sure some of our keen woodworkers like @AndrewJones@Wayne, @She_Skills or @darylhewston will be able to assist. What are you planning to do with the hardwood? 

 

Let me also extend a very warm welcome to Workshop. I'm sure you will find plenty of helpful information and inspiring projects from other community members. I also hope you have plenty of fun. I'm looking forward to reading about your own projects and plans. 

 

Jason

Show off your handiwork at the Workshop Gallery
darylhewston
Super Contributor

Re: Correct saw blade

@Brian68

 

G'day Brian, 

Welcome to the workshop.

 

To answer your question will depend on what you are cutting (picture frames, floorboards, railway sleepers etc) and the type of cut (finish) you want.

 

If cutting floorboards etc, a fine tooth blade will give you a better finished cut.  If a fine finish is not required, then use a larger tooth blade.

 

Most standard blades come in either 24 (rough), 48 (medium) or 60 (fine) teeth.

 

Maybe consider a 'thin kerf' (80-100 tooth) blade if cutting finer timber and laminated boards.

 

Hope this helps

 

Cheers

Daryl

 

 

Wayne
Super Contributor

Re: Correct saw blade

@Brian 68

The other consideration for correct saw blade is whether you are Cross Cutting (sawing across the grain) or Rip Cutting (sawing along the grain). Generally Rip Cutting blades have fewer teeth (16 to 40) whereas Cross Cutting blades have more teeth (40 to 80). Most Hobbyists and DIYers would probably settle for a Combination Blade which is suitable for both Cross cutting and Rip cutting, Combination Blades are structured differently, usually having groups of teeth consisting of 1 rip cut tooth and 4 cross cut teeth with deeper gullets, Combination blades come in 40, 60 and 80 teeth.
Cabinet makers and professionals will generally use a dedicated blade type for Rip or Cross Cutting and also for varying timber or sheet types. How much you invest will be justified by how much use it will get, high quality saw blades are not cheap.

Regards
Wood Working with Wayne
Community Manager Jason
Community Manager

Re: Correct saw blade

Fantastic advice, many thanks @Wayne and @darylhewston.

 

I'm sure new member @Brian68 really appreciates it.

 

Jason

Show off your handiwork at the Workshop Gallery
She_Skills
Established Contributor

Re: Correct saw blade

All the above. Only thing I'd add is if you are cutting thick timber (i.e. sleepers) that you do a few passes and go slowly (but not so slow that you burn the timber). If I'm cutting a 40mm slab, I'll set up a fence, then do the first pass with the blade set to 20mm, then put the blade down to 40mm to cut through the rest.

Why join the Workshop community?

Workshop is a friendly place to learn, get ideas and find inspiration for your home improvement projects