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Best way to budget for a pool? What do they really cost?

Kim
Established Contributor

Best way to budget for a pool? What do they really cost?

We are in the process of considering a new house build, which is challenging enough in its own right.  A big part of our motivation is to move our young family into a better family home, with a better family lifestyle - so the lure of a pool is an exciting proposition.

 

I'm having a hard time understanding the basic costs involved in pools - particularly the basic choices/options available and how that translates to the end price.

 

Hoping that workshoppers may have some similar experience or advice to share?

 

Even harder is understanding the running costs once the pool is in.  Any advice would be appreciated.

BIM_Engineer
Valued Contributor

Re: Best way to budget for a pool? What do they really cost?

@Kim you might want to read this

Getting quotes & Current Trade rates
I got a quote to fix and repack my sand filter

and it worked out to be $200/hr?

BTW the parts & graded sand costs $30 and it took me 2 hrs (DIY)

For specific technical answers you will need to provide more Information, Drawings,specis,etc,etc

LOL...Pool costing$ (bashing$) trends  on Social Media during the summer months tho

the weathers been moderate this year.

 

Kim
Established Contributor

Re: Best way to budget for a pool? What do they really cost?

Thanks @BIM_Engineer, that's really helpful advice that I'll keep handy for future use!

 

Being the proud owner of one, would you recommend a salt water pool?  

BIM_Engineer
Valued Contributor

Re: Best way to budget for a pool? What do they really cost?

@Kim There are many variables to consider
I have a large chlorine concrete pool that is covered.. chemical & running costs are low
for a smaller pool I would prefer/recommend F/Glass salt with shade cover
Joker
Experienced Contributor

Re: Best way to budget for a pool? What do they really cost?

@Kim

 

There are a lot of variables so if you could give us an idea of what kind of pool you would be thinking about (fibreglass or concrete), how big you would like, fencing and the extent of paving and landscaping then we should be able to help more. 

 

As a rough guide, if you are thinking about a fairly standard 8 x 4m fibreglass pool on a block with good access you would probably be looking at $30,000-40,000. Prices should include installation and all plumbing, filtration system and solar heating.   

 

Then of course you have the cost of pool fencing, which is hugely variable based on what you choose, and paving and landscaping. I'd suggest most people would spend at least $10,000 there. 

 

Running costs aren't that big once you're up and running. Modern pool pumps don't use a lot of electricity and if you look after the pool you shouldn't need many chemicals. I'd suggest a few hundred dollars a year would cover most pools. 

Community Manager Jason
Community Manager

Re: Best way to budget for a pool? What do they really cost?

I would certainly recommend you go with salt @Kim. We love our salt-water pool. 

 

Jason

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Kim
Established Contributor

Re: Best way to budget for a pool? What do they really cost?

Thanks @Jason@Joker@BIM_Engineer.  Really helpful.  I think we will explore a saltwater pool option a little more closely.  Joker, I'm feeling a bit brighter after your costing suggestion!  I was expecting it to cost more than $30k-$40k.

 

Fibreglass would be ok - tiled would be my preference though, I think.

 

My other question is about 'self cleaning' pools.  Is this as literal as it sounds?? (Sounds too good to be true)

 

K

Kermit
Valued Contributor

Re: Best way to budget for a pool? What do they really cost?

I would expect tiling would significantly add to the cost - fibreglass is a cheaper option because less labour is involved.

 

The big advantage of concrete is that you can get any shape you want. So if you want a really deep pool or an unusual shape you don't really have any option but to go with concrete. But if you want a standard size I reckon fibreglass is the way to go.

 

You might also want to consider whether you like a warmer pool. Most fibreglass pools seem easier to warm and keep warm.

 

Be a little wary of those self-cleaning systems. They sound great but pool cleaning robots are now really cheap and efficient, and easily chucked out and replaced if needed. If you have problems with a self-cleaning system it could be really difficult and expensive to fix. 

 

I've also shared this before but something important I picked up: It seems a lot of companies quote cartridge filters which apparently require regular cleaning and can be a pain in the long-term. A sand filter is a much better option for ease of cleaning and long-term maintenance. There’s usually not that much price difference – probably only a few hundred dollars. Pool builders prefer the ease of a cartridge because they don't have to plumb a waste line. If you do end up going with a cartridge, make sure they make provision to empty (reduce the water level) of the pool somehow. I've talked to a pool guy who has seen heaps of pools with no provision to reduce the water level and with lots of rain you can end up with a pool that overflows which can be problematic.

Joker
Experienced Contributor

Re: Best way to budget for a pool? What do they really cost?

A guy from a pool removal company is quoted here as saying a post costs a few thousand dollars to run each year. I think he is massively exaggerated to suit his own purposes. 

 

https://www.domain.com.au/news/space-safety-and-money-why-sydneysiders-are-getting-rid-of-their-back...

 

The article also claims you only swim for a couple of months a year, which is ridiculous. Even in Melbourne if you have solar you'll be able to swim for six months of the year. But I guess the article does show how important it is to get solar so you use the pool more. Old style concrete pools with no heating do stay pretty cold...

Kira
New Contributor

Re: Best way to budget for a pool? What do they really cost?

Three things all of us need to consider when building a pool.
1. Deciding on the shape and size - functionality first
2. Extra features like diving boards and slides - they come with a price tag
3. Landscaping - what suits our needs
Find out more: http://www.restumping-melbourne.com.au/three-things-consider-building-a-pool/

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