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What to do in the garden in June

Community Manager Jason
Community Manager

What to do in the garden in June

It's now winter and the temptation is to stay indoors next to the heater. But there's still jobs to do around the garden that will ensure great results when the weather starts to get warmer later in the year. 

 

Here's some tips from the Bunnings team about what to do in the garden in June.

 

What to plant

 

June is a good month to top up your mulch, add liquid fertiliser and get some winter fruit and vegies into the garden.

 

If you live in a tropical area now is the time to plant leeks, rocket, beetroot, celery, lettuce broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, onions, spinach, silverbeet and sweet potato. For something sweet, plant strawberries rockmelon, kiwi fruit and figs. If you’re after herbs, go for basil, garlic, ginger, sage, oregano, rosemary, marjoram, chives and coriander. Marigolds, lupins, pansies and violas will brighten up your garden.

 

In sub-tropical areas you can start planting beans, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, peas, lettuce, rocket and snow peas. When it comes to herbs you can plant chicory and garlic. For a splash of colour go with marigolds, lupins, pansies and violas.

 

In temperate climates, it’s time for Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, peas, beans, radish, turnips, swedes and strawberries. For herbs, there’s garlic, chamomile, lemon grass, mint and lemon balm. And to attract pollinators like bees, plant cornflower, calendula, pansies, matthiola, viola and snapdragons.

 

In colder regions, you can start planting, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, peas, beans, turnips and rhubarb crowns. Planting sage among these will help repel caterpillars and moths. Dianthus, cornflower, pansy, verbena, and lupins will add some colour to your garden.

 

What to pick

 

June is all about citrus fruit, so mandarins, oranges, lemons, limes and grapefruit are ready to pick. There’s also pink lady apples, while in warmer parts of the country tomatoes, bananas and melons are ripe and ready. When it comes to vegies, cabbage, cauliflower, onions, potatoes, pumpkin and spinach are all in season.

 

What to do

 

Winter is the time to feed your growing bulbs with a seaweed fertiliser or a low-environmental impact liquid fertiliser, it will give them a real kickstart. Don’t forget to give your fruit trees a feed as well.

 

When your azalea buds start showing some colour, spray them with fungicide, this will protect them against petal blight.

 

Heavy rain may have washed away some mulch, so now is the time to top it up in your vegie patches, herb gardens and ornamental beds. Mulching is a good way to stop weeds as well as keeping in moisture. When applying mulch, make sure you keep it away from plant stems, especially young seedlings. It’s also best to mulch after you’ve watered.

 

If you still need to water your garden, do it first thing in the morning. But check the moisture level of your soil before turning on your tap or reticulation.

 

Hope you find these tips useful. Workshop members are very welcome to add your tips for gardening at this time of year by replying below.

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