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Good old veggie garden

SarahCan
Regular Browser

Good old veggie garden

My family and I decided it would be fun to plant a veggie patch a few months ago, and we have loved watching each vegetable flourish and grow...although the tomatoes have absolutely taken over and the poor little snowpeas which were behind them in the patch didn't survive - very sad!  We did a big prune a week or so ago and the tomatoes have ripened beautifully since then, so now we're having fun picking them (my two year old enjoys throwing them around the garden too...getting them safely inside is a work in progress!).

 

More photos to come over the next few months!  And don't mind the kale...something is eating it (any ideas as to how I can stop that?!).

 

Tomatoes.jpg

Community Manager Jason
Community Manager

Re: Good old veggie garden

A very warm welcome to Workshop @SarahCan. It's fantastic to have you as part of the community.

 

Many thanks for sharing this photo and congrats on the tomato harvest. It's great to get kids involved in gardening. Make sure you check out the member profile we published today on @CathM. It should be right up your alley. 

 

Regarding the Kale, have you had a really good look at all the leaves to try to find the offender? Looks like it might be a caterpillar or a grub. We've had a few chomping on our basil and have been able to just find them and pull them off. 

 

Jason

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Community Manager Jason
Community Manager

Re: Good old veggie garden

How did you go with your kale @SarahCan? Did you find the culprit eating it?

 

It would also be good to see what you're planting in autumn.

 

Jason

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bluebec
Junior Contributor

Re: Good old veggie garden

The kale is probably being munched on my white cabbage moth catepillars.  They love all plants from the mustard (brassica) family (broccoli, kale, cabbage, bok choi, etc). 

 

Two ways to reduce their impact is to plant nasturtiums which the white cabbage moth catepillars will eat instead, or plant your brassicas on two sides of the garden, expecting that one will be munched, the other left alone.  That is what generally happens to me.

 

Planting sacrificial plants for pests is generally a good way to go, though it can be hard when the catepillars eat the one you want to keep. I plant kale for it to be eaten so my broccoli is left alone.

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